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23rd
Nov
Fri
  • Virginia General Assembly 2013: Legislation Regarding Abortion, Contraception Coverage, Rape

    active-rva:

    HB 1: The Fetal Personhood Bill, back again for another round. Establishes “personhood” as beginning at conception, outlawing all abortion and processes that could interfere with a fertilized egg.

    HB 1285: Bans and criminalizes abortions after 20 weeks gestation, except in narrow cases of medical threat to the mother, under the assumption that at this level of development, unborn children can feel pain. Depending upon what penalties are incurred, who determines what severity of medical threat merits a termination, and the impact of “methods most likely to allow the survival of the child” on the mother’s health, this could be an inconsequential bill or a negative one.

    HB 1316: Establishes sex-selective abortions as a felony, requires women seeking abortions to sign a statement acknowledging this. Sex-selective abortion is not a widespread or even observed problem in Virginia; this bill was generated to support the anti-abortion talking point that it is, and to provide another avenue of prosecuting doctors who perform abortions.

    HB 1112: Eliminates the HPV vaccine requirement for girls entering public school. The driving motivation of this bill is the colloquial belief that protecting girls from Human Papillomavirus, a sexually transmitted infection that can cause cervical cancer, will cause them to become promiscuous. This has potentially wide-reaching public health implications, and is based on a misconception. 

    SB 277: Prohibits and criminalizes forced abortion. At face value this appears positive- nobody should be forced to have an abortion against their will. However, it was introduced by the same senator, Ralph K. Smith (R), who introduced the anti-sex-selective abortion bill, and appears to be merely another way to enter fetuses at all levels of development into law as “unborn children”. Supports the anti-abortion meme that abortion doctors force women into abortions.

    SB 21: Broadens the definition of rape to remove the requirement of force. “Any person who has sexual intercourse with a complaining witness, accomplished against the complaining witness’s will by coercion, is guilty of rape. Currently such an offense must be accomplished by force, threat, or intimidation.”

    HB 1315: A Conscience Clause exempting employers from covering contraception, sterilization, and abortificant drugs in their employee insurance plan, for any reason.

    HB 1314: Requires that all insurers offering policies to employers offer a policy that does not include contraception, sterilization, and abortificant drug coverage, in order to furnish employers who are taking advantage of the Conscience Clause outlined in HB 1315.

    Buckle up, looks like it’s going to be an interesting season yet again.

  • 12th
    Apr
    Thu
  • bdtmhouse:

Interested in eradicating sexual injustice? Post or message me to get involved in our screening of the film 12th and Delaware. We also need help organizing educational sessions on campus.  Our goal is to educate women (and men) about the truths of Crisis Pregnancy Centers and they way they misrepresent themselves to women experiencing unintended pregnancies.  We don’t care whether you’re prochoice or antichoice - we can all agree that misleading women is wrong.  #TruthFail at VCU

    bdtmhouse:

    Interested in eradicating sexual injustice? Post or message me to get involved in our screening of the film 12th and Delaware. We also need help organizing educational sessions on campus.  Our goal is to educate women (and men) about the truths of Crisis Pregnancy Centers and they way they misrepresent themselves to women experiencing unintended pregnancies.  We don’t care whether you’re prochoice or antichoice - we can all agree that misleading women is wrong.  #TruthFail at VCU

  • 1st
    Dec
    Thu
  • Another Amazing Pro-Choice Argument I Ran Across on the Internets

    [T]he proscription of abortion has never resulted in its complete abolition … The only results of proscription have been illegal abortions that usually result in the death of the would-be mother from [hemorrhaging] or, at best, permanent [sterility]. Until the advent of the pill in 1960, married women did not have access to effective birth control (unmarried women won that right in 1972, courtesy of “Eisenstadt v. Baird”). Medicines can alter the efficacy of the pill. Despite women’s best intentions (and those of their partners), unintended pregnancy is always a possibility. There’s no morality whatsoever in [compelling] a woman to submit to unsafe surgical practices (assuming that Plan B has also been proscribed under said circumstances). No woman who doesn’t wish to become a mother should be sacrificed to prove some kind of so-called moral point. If legal abortion takes away the potential for human life, illegal abortion kills both extant and potential human life. There is no moral safety net for the “pro-life” movement.

    I have made typo corrections in brackets, but did not make any substantive changes to the original post.  - sweetcommie

    (Source: Slate)

  • 18th
    Nov
    Fri
  • youatemytailor:

angel-cake:

prolongedeyecontact:

Inconvenience? You hear that people capable of getting pregnant? This is all merely an inconvenience:
Normal, frequent or expectable temporary side effects of pregnancy:
exhaustion (weariness common from first weeks)
altered appetite and senses of taste and smell
nausea and vomiting (50% of women, first trimester)
heartburn and indigestion
constipation
weight gain
dizziness and light-headedness
bloating, swelling, fluid retention
hemmorhoids
abdominal cramps
yeast infections
congested, bloody nose
acne and mild skin disorders
skin discoloration (chloasma, face and abdomen)
mild to severe backache and strain
increased headaches
difficulty sleeping, and discomfort while sleeping
increased urination and incontinence
bleeding gums
pica
breast pain and discharge
swelling of joints, leg cramps, joint pain
difficulty sitting, standing in later pregnancy
inability to take regular medications
shortness of breath
higher blood pressure
hair loss
tendency to anemia
curtailment of ability to participate in some sports and activities
infection including from serious and potentially fatal disease(pregnant women are immune suppressed compared with non-pregnant women, andare more susceptible to fungal and certain other diseases)
extreme pain on delivery
hormonal mood changes, including normal post-partum depression
continued post-partum exhaustion and recovery period (exacerbated if a c-section — major surgery — is required, sometimes taking up to a full year to fully recover)
Normal, expectable, or frequent PERMANENT side effects of pregnancy:
stretch marks (worse in younger women)
loose skin
permanent weight gain or redistribution
abdominal and vaginal muscle weakness
pelvic floor disorder (occurring in as many as 35% of middle-aged former child-bearers and 50% of elderly former child-bearers, associated with urinary and rectal incontinence, discomfort and reduced quality of life)
changes to breasts
varicose veins
scarring from episiotomy or c-section
other permanent aesthetic changes to the body (all of these are downplayed by women, because the culture values youth and beauty)
increased proclivity for hemmorhoids
loss of dental and bone calcium (cavities and osteoporosis)
Occasional complications and side effects:
spousal/partner abuse
hyperemesis gravidarum
temporary and permanent injury to back
severe scarring requiring later surgery (especially after additional pregnancies)
dropped (prolapsed) uterus (especially after additional pregnancies, and other pelvic floor weaknesses — 11% of women, including cystocele, rectocele, and enterocele)
pre-eclampsia (edema and hypertension, the most common complication of pregnancy, associated with eclampsia, and affecting 7 - 10% of pregnancies)
eclampsia (convulsions, coma during pregnancy or labor, high risk of death)
gestational diabetes
placenta previa
anemia (which can be life-threatening)
thrombocytopenic purpura
severe cramping
embolism (blood clots)
medical disability requiring full bed rest (frequently ordered during part of many pregnancies varying from days to months for health of either mother or baby)
diastasis recti, also torn abdominal muscles
mitral valve stenosis (most common cardiac complication)
serious infection and disease (e.g. increased risk of tuberculosis)
hormonal imbalance
ectopic pregnancy (risk of death)
broken bones (ribcage, “tail bone”)
hemorrhage and
numerous other complications of delivery
refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease
aggravation of pre-pregnancy diseases and conditions (e.g. epilepsy is present in .5% of pregnant women, and the pregnancy alters drug metabolism and treatment prospects all the while it increases the number and frequency of seizures)
severe post-partum depression and psychosis
research now indicates a possible link between ovarian cancer and female fertility treatments, including “egg harvesting” from infertile women and donors
research also now indicates correlations between lower breast cancer survival rates and proximity in time to onset of cancer of last pregnancy
research also indicates a correlation between having six or more pregnancies and a risk of coronary and cardiovascular disease
Less common (but serious) complications:
peripartum cardiomyopathy
cardiopulmonary arrest
magnesium toxicity
severe hypoxemia/acidosis
massive embolism
increased intracranial pressure, brainstem infarction
molar pregnancy, gestational trophoblastic disease (like a pregnancy-induced cancer)
malignant arrhythmia
circulatory collapse
placental abruption
obstetric fistula
More permanent side effects:
future infertility
permanent disability
death.
In addition, there’s the risk of losing one’s job and, by extension, home; pregnancy/childbirth triggering traumatic experiences due to rape, molestation, or partner/spousal abuse; body or gender dysphoria; missing or dropping out of school; the potential trauma of choosing adoption; suffering from pregnancy related job discrimination; the economic toll of pregnancy and raising a child; and not being able to continue taking important medications or exacerbating pre-existing conditions.
Here’s some statistics:
358,000 people die annually from pregnancy related complications.
20% of people who die during pregnancy are murder victims.
The risk of maternal mortality is highest for adolescents under 15 years old.
Complications in pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among adolescents in most developing countries.
A person’s lifetime risk of maternal death – the probability that a 15-year-old will eventually die from a maternal cause – is 1 in 4300 in developed countries, versus 1 in 120 in developing countries.
A pregnant person has a 35.6% greater risk of being a victim of violence than a non-pregnant person. The estimated prevalence of violence against people during pregnancy ranges from four percent to eight percent.
40% of all pregnant people have some complications during pregnancy or childbirth. About 15% have complications that are potentially life-threatening.
Tl;dr So in case that wasn’t clear: pregnancy is always life threatening and never merely an “inconvenience”.
[ETA: I wish beyond all belief this edit wasn’t necessary, but I guess it is. This post isn’t meant to vilify pregnancy or the people who choose it. As I’ve said in a reply and an ask, pregnancy is always a valid reproductive choice for those who choose it. As a prochoicer, I support all reproductive choices including birthing ones like advocating for the choice to have VBACs, home births, and the right to say no to unwanted c-sections. I will fight as hard for those rights as I do for the right to an abortion. I don’t think birth is bad for those that want to do it, but some of us would literally rather die. This isn’t meant as a scare tactic against fellow people who can get pregnant. This is about the flippant manner in which cis men like to dismiss people’s concerns that pregnancy is more than an “inconvenience.” The last time I checked people don’t regularly die from inconveniences. For more see: this reply and this ask, which I also made rebloggable on request.]

people like joe, who are never going to carry a baby, do not get to talk about ‘inconvenience’ to uteruses. YOU carry it.

    youatemytailor:

    angel-cake:

    prolongedeyecontact:

    Inconvenience? You hear that people capable of getting pregnant? This is all merely an inconvenience:

    Normal, frequent or expectable temporary side effects of pregnancy:

    • exhaustion (weariness common from first weeks)
    • altered appetite and senses of taste and smell
    • nausea and vomiting (50% of women, first trimester)
    • heartburn and indigestion
    • constipation
    • weight gain
    • dizziness and light-headedness
    • bloating, swelling, fluid retention
    • hemmorhoids
    • abdominal cramps
    • yeast infections
    • congested, bloody nose
    • acne and mild skin disorders
    • skin discoloration (chloasma, face and abdomen)
    • mild to severe backache and strain
    • increased headaches
    • difficulty sleeping, and discomfort while sleeping
    • increased urination and incontinence
    • bleeding gums
    • pica
    • breast pain and discharge
    • swelling of joints, leg cramps, joint pain
    • difficulty sitting, standing in later pregnancy
    • inability to take regular medications
    • shortness of breath
    • higher blood pressure
    • hair loss
    • tendency to anemia
    • curtailment of ability to participate in some sports and activities
    • infection including from serious and potentially fatal disease
      (pregnant women are immune suppressed compared with non-pregnant women, and
      are more susceptible to fungal and certain other diseases)
    • extreme pain on delivery
    • hormonal mood changes, including normal post-partum depression
    • continued post-partum exhaustion and recovery period (exacerbated if a c-section — major surgery — is required, sometimes taking up to a full year to fully recover)

    Normal, expectable, or frequent PERMANENT side effects of pregnancy:

    • stretch marks (worse in younger women)
    • loose skin
    • permanent weight gain or redistribution
    • abdominal and vaginal muscle weakness
    • pelvic floor disorder (occurring in as many as 35% of middle-aged former child-bearers and 50% of elderly former child-bearers, associated with urinary and rectal incontinence, discomfort and reduced quality of life)
    • changes to breasts
    • varicose veins
    • scarring from episiotomy or c-section
    • other permanent aesthetic changes to the body (all of these are downplayed by women, because the culture values youth and beauty)
    • increased proclivity for hemmorhoids
    • loss of dental and bone calcium (cavities and osteoporosis)

    Occasional complications and side effects:

    • spousal/partner abuse
    • hyperemesis gravidarum
    • temporary and permanent injury to back
    • severe scarring requiring later surgery (especially after additional pregnancies)
    • dropped (prolapsed) uterus (especially after additional pregnancies, and other pelvic floor weaknesses — 11% of women, including cystocele, rectocele, and enterocele)
    • pre-eclampsia (edema and hypertension, the most common complication of pregnancy, associated with eclampsia, and affecting 7 - 10% of pregnancies)
    • eclampsia (convulsions, coma during pregnancy or labor, high risk of death)
    • gestational diabetes
    • placenta previa
    • anemia (which can be life-threatening)
    • thrombocytopenic purpura
    • severe cramping
    • embolism (blood clots)
    • medical disability requiring full bed rest (frequently ordered during part of many pregnancies varying from days to months for health of either mother or baby)
    • diastasis recti, also torn abdominal muscles
    • mitral valve stenosis (most common cardiac complication)
    • serious infection and disease (e.g. increased risk of tuberculosis)
    • hormonal imbalance
    • ectopic pregnancy (risk of death)
    • broken bones (ribcage, “tail bone”)
    • hemorrhage and
    • numerous other complications of delivery
    • refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease
    • aggravation of pre-pregnancy diseases and conditions (e.g. epilepsy is present in .5% of pregnant women, and the pregnancy alters drug metabolism and treatment prospects all the while it increases the number and frequency of seizures)
    • severe post-partum depression and psychosis
    • research now indicates a possible link between ovarian cancer and female fertility treatments, including “egg harvesting” from infertile women and donors
    • research also now indicates correlations between lower breast cancer survival rates and proximity in time to onset of cancer of last pregnancy
    • research also indicates a correlation between having six or more pregnancies and a risk of coronary and cardiovascular disease

    Less common (but serious) complications:

    • peripartum cardiomyopathy
    • cardiopulmonary arrest
    • magnesium toxicity
    • severe hypoxemia/acidosis
    • massive embolism
    • increased intracranial pressure, brainstem infarction
    • molar pregnancy, gestational trophoblastic disease (like a pregnancy-induced cancer)
    • malignant arrhythmia
    • circulatory collapse
    • placental abruption
    • obstetric fistula

    More permanent side effects:

    • future infertility
    • permanent disability
    • death.

    In addition, there’s the risk of losing one’s job and, by extension, home; pregnancy/childbirth triggering traumatic experiences due to rape, molestation, or partner/spousal abuse; body or gender dysphoria; missing or dropping out of school; the potential trauma of choosing adoption; suffering from pregnancy related job discrimination; the economic toll of pregnancy and raising a child; and not being able to continue taking important medications or exacerbating pre-existing conditions.

    Here’s some statistics:

    Tl;dr So in case that wasn’t clear: pregnancy is always life threatening and never merely an “inconvenience”.

    [ETA: I wish beyond all belief this edit wasn’t necessary, but I guess it is. This post isn’t meant to vilify pregnancy or the people who choose it. As I’ve said in a reply and an ask, pregnancy is always a valid reproductive choice for those who choose it. As a prochoicer, I support all reproductive choices including birthing ones like advocating for the choice to have VBACs, home births, and the right to say no to unwanted c-sections. I will fight as hard for those rights as I do for the right to an abortion. I don’t think birth is bad for those that want to do it, but some of us would literally rather die. This isn’t meant as a scare tactic against fellow people who can get pregnant. This is about the flippant manner in which cis men like to dismiss people’s concerns that pregnancy is more than an “inconvenience.” The last time I checked people don’t regularly die from inconveniences. For more see: this reply and this ask, which I also made rebloggable on request.]

    people like joe, who are never going to carry a baby, do not get to talk about ‘inconvenience’ to uteruses. YOU carry it.

  • 14th
    Oct
    Fri
  • The Most Convincing Pro-Choice Argument I Have Ever Read

    Courtesy of user classy03-K64 in r/atheism:

    This is long, but I really hope you will read it and seriously consider what I’m saying. As a woman who takes her birth control very seriously but [edit for “it” typo] is still cognizant of the fact that it might fail through no fault of my own, this is a very important issue for me.

    There is a huge, huge difference between something that might affect you financially if the woman chooses to keep the baby and something that absolutely forces you to let another creature inhabit your body and leech off your oxygen and food and then force its way out of your genitals, possibly requiring them to be cut open and then sewn back up, or, if you’re not so lucky, it will simply be cut out of your stomach. There is no way that is at all comparable to maybe paying child support.

    Did you miss the part where I explained why “I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for X” is extremely flawed reasoning? What if your parents met because your dad was an EMT and your mom got in a car crash? Would you suddenly become in favor of car crashes because “I wouldn’t be here if not for a car crash”?

    "Why would you want to force someone to go through a car crash?"
    “I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for a car crash, so I can’t support trying to eliminate car crashes.”

    Yes, sometimes it’s our place to judge. It’s not your place to judge in this case because you have no idea why any given woman got pregnant. Maybe she got raped but is too afraid to report it and thus can’t get your legal exception. Maybe she’s never been educated about birth control and her boyfriend pressured her into sex. Maybe her boyfriend took off the condom in the dark. Maybe she has another child and if she has to take time off work for a pregnancy she’ll lose her job and not be able to support her existing kid. Maybe she just got a divorce because of abuse and cheating and then realized she’s pregnant with her ex-husband’s baby. Maybe she’s been married for twenty years and has four children and her husband is religious and against birth control and she just can’t handle another one. Maybe she used hormonal birth control perfectly responsibly and she was one of the few times it doesn’t work. Maybe the baby is going to have extreme health complications that will severely impact its quality of life, as well as hers. Maybe she forgot her pill one too many times, or left it in a glove compartment where it got so hot it stopped working and she didn’t know enough about chemistry to know that ahead of time. (Yes, a company once got out of a lawsuit for failed birth control because they proved the birth control in question was left out in a car at the Grand Canyon.) Maybe the condom broke. Maybe she and her boyfriend got drunk and forgot a condom. Maybe she’s being pimped out in the ghetto. Maybe she didn’t know you have to wait a week for the IUD to start working. Maybe her boyfriend lied about being sterile, or was just wrong about being sterile. Or maybe she’s just young and stupid, in which case why on earth do you want to make her responsible for a fetus’ well-being?

    In the end, we know that the vast majority of abortions happen before there is even the slightest chance of the fetus resembling a unique person: in the first trimester. I could go off on a long medical explanation of why they are not conscious or able to feel pain until birth anyway, but for the sake of discussion let’s assume we’re talking about only the first trimester.

    If a woman decides right away that she doesn’t want to go through a pregnancy, she will not have to cause suffering or pain to any conscious being in order to prevent doing so. No one will regret not getting to live. She will probably go on to have several other children when she is actually ready, and she may then say, as many do, that aborting the first pregnancy allowed her to have several others in the future. Her abortion will be like one of the countless natural abortions that occur in every fertile woman trying to get pregnant, wherein an embryo is created but fails to implant properly on the uterine wall and is discharged from the body like any other period.

    You’re okay with abortion in cases of rape, although you probably think murder is worse than rape in general, so clearly you don’t think first-trimester abortion is murder. There is no reason to force someone to go through a pregnancy simply because they screwed up, when you also think that an abortion, in and of itself, is not automatically morally wrong. You want to have a rape exception because you think that if the woman didn’t get raped, the pregnancy is “her fault” and therefore she has to deal with it, even though this helps no one.

    If abortion raises your ire because you don’t like people being careless with their birth control, then just say so. Then start working to bring better sex education to schools and more cheap birth control options to the country. There is no reason it should significantly impact your view on the legality of abortion, because in any given abortion you, again, have no idea what kind of birth control use or responsibility led to that particular pregnancy. If you don’t think flushing out an unconscious human jelly is inherently a terrible thing, seeing as it has no awareness it was ever alive and does not have enough brain stem to even feel pain, then it is not your place to come in and say that some women can have one and some women can’t just because you think some of them are good enough to deserve to make their own choices and some aren’t.

    We’re both atheists, so we know there’s no such thing as destiny. There’s absolutely no reason to think that simply because you were conceived, you were meant to be born. If you still believe that, you should go spend some time looking at children with harlequin-type ichthyosis. The simple fact of your conception does not mean the world is going to be incomplete without you. Embryos die all the time and they do not regret it because they cannot. There are already more living children lacking homes than we can handle.

    Banning abortion solves absolutely zero problems, and creates many new ones, not to mention being an extremely basic violation of my right to bodily autonomy and personal determination. What exactly were you hoping would be achieved by banning abortion?

  • »

    Accent Red by Neil Talwar